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Western Airlines Boeing 727-200 Die-Cast Model

In stock
SKU
2052
$99.99

Introduced as Boeing’s shorter-range alternative to the 707, the new Tri-Jet airliner was intended to fly out of smaller airports that its heavier counterpart could not operate from. 

Introduced as Boeing’s shorter-range alternative to the 707, the new Tri-Jet airliner was intended to fly out of smaller airports that its heavier counterpart could not operate from.

Introduced as Boeing’s shorter-range alternative to the 707, the new Tri-Jet airliner was intended to fly out of smaller airports that its heavier counterpart could not operate from. Introduced in the mid-1960s after flying in ’63, the iconic T-tail and engine design would set it apart from others in its class. Within two decades of operation nearly 2,000 were manufactured, flying routes across the globe.

 

Up to 155 standard class passengers can be seated in the 727-200 variant, with a crew of three in the nose including the flight engineer upon introduction. Later in its life, this assortment would shrink back to 2 pilots, as modern aircraft systems automate the process. Powering the aircraft is a set of three Pratt & Whitney JT8D engines which create around 45,000 lbs combined thrust on takeoff, with one on the tail and two under the wings. Altitude ceiling of the jet is 42,000 ft, with a cruising speed of 593 mph and a maximum weight of 172,000 lbs.

 

As one of nearly 50 operated by Western Airlines, the Boeing 727-200 was one of the latest aircraft in the fleet. Complimenting the early 737-200 and second-generation 737-300 models, the 727 could fulfil routes from shorter airports than predecessor 707s in the 60s. Until 1986, this fleet would remain in service under Western Airlines, with the following months resulting in the operator being a subsidiary of Delta Air Lines. Die-Cast version has an accurate paint scheme, etched panel lines, pad-printed decals, and pre-installed detailed landing gear. Measures 9.5”l with a 6.5” wingspan at 1:200 scale.

 

  • Features etched panel lines, pad printed decals, and authentic livery, with small antennas and surface detailing carefully reproduced.
  • Includes retracted or deployed landing gear with rotating wheels and metal display stand.
  • Measures 9.5”l with a 6.5” wingspan at 1:200 scale 
  • Highly collectable and officially licensed.

Introduced as Boeing’s shorter-range alternative to the 707, the new Tri-Jet airliner was intended to fly out of smaller airports that its heavier counterpart could not operate from.

Introduced as Boeing’s shorter-range alternative to the 707, the new Tri-Jet airliner was intended to fly out of smaller airports that its heavier counterpart could not operate from. Introduced in the mid-1960s after flying in ’63, the iconic T-tail and engine design would set it apart from others in its class. Within two decades of operation nearly 2,000 were manufactured, flying routes across the globe.

 

Up to 155 standard class passengers can be seated in the 727-200 variant, with a crew of three in the nose including the flight engineer upon introduction. Later in its life, this assortment would shrink back to 2 pilots, as modern aircraft systems automate the process. Powering the aircraft is a set of three Pratt & Whitney JT8D engines which create around 45,000 lbs combined thrust on takeoff, with one on the tail and two under the wings. Altitude ceiling of the jet is 42,000 ft, with a cruising speed of 593 mph and a maximum weight of 172,000 lbs.

 

As one of nearly 50 operated by Western Airlines, the Boeing 727-200 was one of the latest aircraft in the fleet. Complimenting the early 737-200 and second-generation 737-300 models, the 727 could fulfil routes from shorter airports than predecessor 707s in the 60s. Until 1986, this fleet would remain in service under Western Airlines, with the following months resulting in the operator being a subsidiary of Delta Air Lines. Die-Cast version has an accurate paint scheme, etched panel lines, pad-printed decals, and pre-installed detailed landing gear. Measures 9.5”l with a 6.5” wingspan at 1:200 scale.

 

  • Features etched panel lines, pad printed decals, and authentic livery, with small antennas and surface detailing carefully reproduced.
  • Includes retracted or deployed landing gear with rotating wheels and metal display stand.
  • Measures 9.5”l with a 6.5” wingspan at 1:200 scale 
  • Highly collectable and officially licensed.

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